Absentee landlordism in the British Caribbean, 1750-1833

a paper read at the Indianapolis meeting of the American Historical Association, December 28, 1928
  • 21 Pages
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by
Bryan Edwards Press , London
Absentee landlordism -- West Indies, British., Land tenure -- West Indies, British., West Indies, British -- His
Statementby Lowell Joseph Ragatz.
The Physical Object
Pagination21p. ;
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18937807M

ABSENTEE LANDLORDISM IN THE BRITISH CARIB-BEAN, By Lowell Joseph Ragatz* Absentee landlordism was an outstanding characteristic of British West Indian agriculture during the second half of the eighteenth century and the early nineteenth.

It arose from a variety of causes, and led to political, social and economic eonse. In economics, an absentee landlord is a person who owns and rents out a profit-earning property, but does not live within the property's local economic term "absentee ownership" was popularised by economist Thorstein Veblen's book of the same name, Absentee Ownership.

When used in a local context, the term refers to a landlord of a house or other real estate, who leases the. "Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, –," Agricultural History, Vol.

5, No. 1 (January ), pp. 7–24 in JSTOR Reddock, Rhoda E. "Women and Slavery in the Caribbean: A Feminist Perspective", Latin American Perspectives, (Winter ), 63– 2 The literature on absentee planters and the Caribbean sugar economy is, of course, voluminous.

But, see especially, Lowell J. Ragatz, 'Absentee landlordism in the British Caribbean, ', Agricultural History, v (), ; Ragatz, The fall of the planter.

Description Absentee landlordism in the British Caribbean, 1750-1833 PDF

1 The literature on absentee Caribbean planters and the sugar economy is volu-minous. However, the classic rival statements on the consequences of absenteeism are found in Lowell J. Ragatz, “Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, –,” Agricultural History 5, no.

1 (January ): 7–24; Ragatz, The Fall of the Planter Class. Ragatz, Lowell J. “Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, –” Agricultural History V (): 7– ; L J Ragatz; Ragatz, L.

() " Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, At the heart of the book lies a case study of the plantation-owning Lascelles and the. Ragatz, Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, London nd.

* L. Ragatz, Guide to the Study of British Caribbean History, Washington, DC, [Also, annotated: L. Ragatz, Statistics for the Study of British Caribbean Economic History, London,  , ‘The Stamp Act crisis in the British Caribbean’, William and Mary Quarterly, 51, 2 (), –26 O’Shaughnessy, Andrew J., ‘The formation of a commercial lobby: The West India interest, British colonial policy and the American Revolution’, Historical Journal, 40, 1 (), 71– Smith, British Guiana, (London: Chapman and Hall, ), p.

31 remarks that the 1750-1833 book after the final abolition of slavery in saw the institutionalizing of a stable social hierarchy in which things English and white were highly valued, things African and black were lowly churches became one of the chief instruments through which these values were disseminated.

Ragatz, L.

Details Absentee landlordism in the British Caribbean, 1750-1833 PDF

() The fall of the planter class in the British Caribbean, a study in social and economic history. New York: Octagon Books.

New York: Octagon Books. Ragatz, L. (no date) ‘Absentee landlordism in the British Caribbean ’, Agricultural History, 5, pp. 7– "Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, ," Agricultural History, Vol.

5, No. 1 (Jan., ), pp. 7–24 in JSTOR Reddock, Rhoda E. "Women and Slavery in the Caribbean: A Feminist Perspective", Latin American Perspectives, (Winter ),   Ragatz, Lowell Joseph.

“Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, ” Agricultural History. (Jan. ): Sheridan, Richard B. “The Guinea Surgeons on the Middle Passage: The Provision of Medical Services in the British Slave Trade.” The International Journal of African Historical Studies.

(): - Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean. Ragatz; Lowell; Ragatz, Lowell J. " Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, – An Historical Account, Appendix, xliv– xlviii. See also Lowell Joseph Ragatz, Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, (London: Bryan Edwards Press, n.d.), ).

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Raymond Williams, The Country and the City (New York: Oxford University Press, ), Slavery was first abolished by the French Republic inthis took effect in all French colonies, except for Martinique and Saint Domingue, which were under British r, slavery in the French West Indies was reinstated in by Napoleon I as France re-secured its possessions in the Caribbean.

Britain abolished the slave trade in and the slavery itself in Ragatz, Lowell Joseph. "Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, –," Agricultural History, Vol. 5, No. 1 (January ), pp.

7–24 in JSTOR; Reddock, Rhoda E. "Women and Slavery in the Caribbean: A Feminist Perspective", Latin American Perspectives. "Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, –", Agricultural History, Vol.

5, No. 1 (January ), pp. 7–24 in JSTOR Frasier, Henry S. (9 November ). Treasures of Barbados. Absentee landlord is an economic term for a person who owns and rents out a profit-earning property, but does not live within the property's local economic term "absentee ownership" was popularised by economist Thorstein Veblen's book of the same name, Absentee ownership.

[1] When used in a local context, the term refers to a landlord of a house or other real estate, who leases the. During the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries the British government had confiscated a great deal of land owned by Catholics and enacted penal laws restricting land-ownership to Protestants.

Although some of these Acts had been repealed, starting infew Catholics purchased land before the famine because estates were too expensive.

The. In there was a slight change: ‘Of-colour’, 19%; white – French, 33%; white British, 48% (23% Scottish, 25% English); unknown, 0%. Bythe majority of the absentee owners were either Scottish or English; the French absentees had all but disappeared.

TNA. CO/31 f Minutes of the Evidence, and Correspondence of. John J. Navin offers a new account of the first half century of settlement in the colony of South Carolina, which he characterizes as The Grim the midth century South Carolina would become the wealthiest British colony in mainland North America, but in recent years scholars long familiar with its distinctive plantation system have turned more attention to these earlier, formative.

THE COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL ORGANIZATION OF THE BRITISH SLAVE TRADE, – THE COMMERCIAL AND FINANCIAL ORGANIZATION OF THE BRITISH SLAVE TRADE, – SHERIDAN, R. Footnotes 1 The Parliamentary History of England (), XXVIII, 2 Noel Deerr, The History of Sugar (), II, 3 Several writers describe the.

Richardson; Bonham C. Economy and Environment in the Caribbean: Barbados and the Windwards in the Late s (The Press University of The West Indies, ) online edition; Ragatz, Lowell Joseph. "Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, ," Agricultural History, Vol.

5, No. 1 (Jan., ), pp. 7–24 in JSTOR. Ragatz, Statistics for the Study of British Caribbean Economic History, London, Lowell Joseph Ragatz, The Fall of the Planter Class in the British Caribbean, New York, L. Ragatz, Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, London, nd.

Slave populations of the British Caribbean, by B. W Higman (Book) 22 editions published between and in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide.

In general, the owners of the plantations resided in Europe, leaving their properties to be handled by agents and overseers. This absentee landlordism left the slaves in the hands of men who were interested solely in profits, and to whom the slave was of little concern other than as a unit of labor.

Slave mortality was high. While the impact of this event on the trajectory of modern Ireland is undeniable, the dominance of British revisionism on both sides of the Atlantic has created the widespread belief that this disaster was natural or unavoidable. In fact, as “Black ’47” shows, it was brought on and exacerbated by British imperialism and absentee landlordism.

As published in the Foundation’s Report for – RAGATZ, LOWELL JOSEPH: Appointed for a study of the social and economic structure of the French Antilles during the 17 th and 18 th centuries; tenure, twelve months from September 1, Born Jat Prairie du Sac, Wisconsin.

Education: University of Wisconsin, B.A.,M.A.,Ph.D., ; University of Pennsylvania. The second great watershed in Caribbean history resulted from the abolition of slavery in the nineteenth century. In the British Caribbean this came betweenwhen a law was passed by the British Parliament to abolish slavery throughout the empire, andwhen the apprenticeship system collapsed prematurely.

"Absentee Landlordism in the British Caribbean, ," Agricultural History, Vol. 5, No. 1 (Jan. ), pp. 7–24 in JSTOR Frasier, Henry S. (9 November ). Treasures of Barbados.Barbados was inhabited by Arawaks and Caribs at the time of European colonization of the Americas in the 16th century.

The island was an English and later British colony from until Sinceit has been a constitutional monarchy and parliamentary democracy, modelled on the Westminster system, with Elizabeth II, Queen of Barbados, as head of state.A major obstacle to understanding Montserrat’s sugar industry and the often-contentious social dynamics that accompanied it has been the absence of a comprehensive study of the small Caribbean island’s plantation-era cultural landscape.

We employ a multi-scalar approach, combining archival research and archaeological survey data, to trace the island’s shifting socio-cultural composition.